Woman Wednesday: Ishanika


Q and A with Ishanika born and raised in India, living in Seattle, Washington

“There have been countless occasions when I wanted to give up, but I turned to look around and discovered blessings along the way. I won’t say it was simple, but I managed to get through it.”


Q: What are you passionate about? 

A: I’m passionate about using my abilities to have a positive impact on society and promote goodness. I think life has some meaning when we try to leave the world in a better condition than we found it. I started off by representing my school at a national life skills summit and leading the social reform initiative club, where we, among other things, counseled the underprivileged and held workshops on menstrual hygiene in rural areas. After earning an MBA in digital marketing, I started using my knowledge to help small businesses and NGOs. In some way, societal good enables the flame that burns within me.

Q: What were your younger years like?

A: My parents gave up a lot to offer me a better life, even though we lived in a small town. My early years were not especially good, though; in order to get a better education, they sent me to a hostel, which traumatized me in several ways. When I first went to a hostel, I was ten years old, and instead of having rooms, we had dormitories, which were like large halls with 10 to 15 beds. At an early age, I was the victim of ragging, groupism, and bullying, and I believe it motivated me to work to improve the world.

Q: What is something valuable you’d like others to know?

A: “You have to fight your own battles” is the most important lesson I’ve learned. It may sound harsh, but it actually helps you grow stronger. I firmly believe that the universe is always working in your favor. There have been countless occasions when I wanted to give up, but I turned to look around and discovered blessings along the way. I won’t say it was simple, but I managed to get through it. So, have confidence in yourself, be truthful, and act in your own best interests because you deserve nothing less.

Q: What does feminism mean to you?
A:
Feminism, in my opinion, is about giving women the same standing as men. The world has made so many strides; science, business, and everything else are so developed, save for the respect for women. Unfortunately, women still have to struggle for fundamental rights like equal pay and the freedom to study abroad. I’m very saddened by the fact that even progressive males treat women so terribly without even realizing it. We have to run the household, make a living, take care of the kids, and still, we have to grovel for equality and affection. We require more female leaders to help us and effect change.

MORE ABOUT ISHANIKA: I like going on adventures, discovering new places, and hiking with my spouse and my foster dog CiCi. I wish to contribute to society and spread love and kindness. My ultimate goal is to support and grow as many NGOs and small businesses as I can. I would be pleased to assist you with your digital marketing needs. You can reach out to me via one of the links provided.

Thank you for reading!

My Insta: https://instagram.com/storyofish?igshid=YmMyMTA2M2Y=

My website : https://ishanika9.wixsite.com/ishanika-sehgal

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ishanika-sehgal-33694a108

Woman Wednesday: Breanna


Q and A with Breanna from Los Angeles, California

“How you do one thing is how you do everything.”


Q: What are you passionate about? 

A: I’m passionate about living a peaceful and purposeful life. I love helping others create this in their lives as well. I’m very intentional with the things I do. I love to learn and expand while also being mindful of the importance of rest and relaxation. I allow myself to have fun with everything. I recently decided to learn to play tennis and it’s been really fun. I’ve had lots of people ask me why I want to learn tennis (honestly they ask me that for most of my hobbies) and my answer is always why not? Why not have fun and try something new that I may grow to love? I believe that we should have the choice to live lives that we absolutely love and are grateful for. This is the reason I started mindset coaching. I’ve met lots of people who felt that their true desires weren’t within reach. They were only doing things out of obligation instead of enjoyment. Mostly due to limiting beliefs put on them by others or self-doubt that had developed over the years.

Q: What were your younger years like?

A: My younger years were very balanced. My father believed in structure and discipline while my mother was a bit more carefree and lenient. I grew up spending time with friends and family while also studying, reading, and doing self-care and personal development things. I was fascinated with making myself smoothies, doing beauty treatments at home, writing out my goals, and shopping. I even went to cosmetology school during high school. I was always pretty organized and have always had a lot of interests. However, my interest in self-improvement has remained constant.

Q: What is something valuable you’d like others to know?

A: How you do one thing is how you do everything. I heard this and it really stuck. I could easily see how this saying resonated in many areas of my life. My behaviors and habits in one area oftentimes pour into other areas. For example, if I am too tired to take my makeup off at the end of the night, the next day I might skip my workout because I just don’t feel like it. The chances of me skipping or giving leniency to something else dramatically increases. I’ve learned to look at my behaviors and habits from the place of the future version of myself, which I call “The Best Version of Myself.” I always ask myself, “Would the best version of you do this?” This helps to keep me disciplined and in alignment with what I ultimately desire for myself. I also find that it keeps me accountable. Of course, I use this ideology with my best judgment. I listen to my body and allow myself to be guided by my intuition because sometimes I do need to take a break.

Q: What does feminism mean to you?
A:
To me, feminism means that women should have the choice to choose various aspects of their lives. It’s not a one-size-fits-all. Not every woman wants the same things out of life, but I think it’s safe to say that we all want to live fulfilling lives. For one, that may look like having a thriving career, while for another, it could look like having a family to care for. And let’s not forget about the women who want both. I think that we should support each other’s wishes even if we want different things for ourselves.

Thank you for reading!

I’d love to invite everyone to connect with me on TikTok @bremichellexo. Also, you can email me directly at bre@bremichelle.com or schedule a time to chat.

Website: https://snipfeed.co/bremichellexo

Woman Wednesday: Marcela


Q and A with Marcela born in Bogotá, Colombia, and living in Sydney, Australia

“Learn to believe in yourself more than anyone, keep pushing, and surround yourself with people who support you.”


Q: What are you passionate about? 

A: Finding my passion wasn’t easy as I was not fixed on one specific subject or a collector. I always dreamt of finding my “passion,” trying different tests, people, books, etc. I was lucky enough to finally find my passion after my third baby. She inspired me to keep fighting for her and my sanity to find real and long-term life solutions to help mothers and babies sleep better. This is how Lulo was born. It’s a sleepy baby koala with a compilation of the best science-based sleeping methods to help your baby get to sleep. Find out more at www.kalmbaby.com. I am passionate about motherhood, my family, baby sleep, “me time,” and having a balanced life. Currently, we are working on refining our mother and baby daily guide routines; these are full-day routines from 0 to 3 years old.

Q: What were your younger years like?

A:  Growing up, I loved playing sports with my younger brother. We had the best time together. My dad was very strict, and there was zero room for mistakes. He taught me lots of manual stuff like fixing the iron or stove when they were not working at a very young age. I think I was 12 years old when I aimed to open a TV, and I was fascinated with all the cables, electronics, etc. I remember breaking the bulb inside… luckily, there was a spare TV. And it was a secret between my brother and me. I grew up in Bogotá, Colombia, where I had my first baby at a very young age. He is now 19 years old. Then I moved to Australia in search of a better life for my son, who I had to leave in Colombia for two painful years until I managed to bring him to Australia and achieve a massive and life-changing goal. I have been living for the last 14+ years in Australia. I met the love of my life, who I married and we had two kids together (ages 4 and 2 years old). He supports me every step of the way, and I am extremely grateful to God for giving me such a unique and special husband.

Q: What is something valuable you’d like others to know?

A: Learn to believe in yourself more than anyone, keep pushing, and surround yourself with people who support you. I have learned that healing yourself internally is possible with God’s help and the people he puts on our paths. Everything has a reason. It may be something that you don’t think you need, but time covers our pain and time will uncover them again.

Q: What does feminism mean to you?
A:
To fight for equal gender benefits. We are still seeing many industries where there is a salary gap between women and men.

Find us at: https://www.kalmbaby.com

Insta: https://www.instagram.com/kalmbabyglobal/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kalmbabyglobal

Thank you for reading!

Woman Wednesday: Keke


Q and A with Keke from Queens, NY

“There is one skill I value the most and that is asking for help.”


Q: What are you passionate about? 

A: I am passionate about helping others by providing motivation, inspiration, and emotional support. I’ve always said that my purpose found me when I was a sophomore in college in 2012 when my grandmother was killed by a car. My line of work involves helping individuals by providing direct care services and providing counseling. I am currently working on planning my Self-Love Tour and building up a Sisterhood Community dedicated to self-love and self-care resources. I help women on a self-love and healing journey by providing coaching services, self-love brunches, retreats, and training sessions.

Q: What were your younger years like?

A:  I have been through a lot growing up. I’ve always felt feelings of abandonment and rejection due to not having an active father in my life. I’ve always been self-driven to accomplish my goals. I have been able to complete undergrad at Mercy College in 2015 with a psychology degree and grad school at St. John’s University in 2017 with a master’s degree in clinical mental health counseling.

After my grandmother was killed in a car accident, I went through anxiety issues, times of hyperventilating, and felt guilty for not seeing her as much as I could’ve. I had to learn how to regulate my emotions, and I learned early on to ask for support. I felt like I was always viewed as being the strong one and to finally allow myself to lean on support helped me through it all. Also, I felt led to go into the social science field after a few months after the accident. I finally made the decision even though I wasn’t sure, and now here I am ten years later operating with my gifts.

Q: What is something valuable you’d like others to know?

A: I want others to know that it’s okay to not be okay. It’s important to process emotions and thoughts and learn the necessary skills to overcome them. Also, I would encourage others to stay encouraged and make use of asking for help. There is one skill I value the most and that is asking for help.

Q: What does feminism mean to you?
A:
Great question. It means being able to be empowered and overcome the challenges society places on women.

MORE ABOUT KEKE: My favorite color is purple, and I love to sing.

Thank you for reading!

Let’s connect! Here: Linktr.ee/sisterhoodofhealing

Woman Wednesday: Ama


Q and A with Ama from Nigeria, Africa, living in Canada

“You have to be ready to put in the work even when you’re not getting the results you desire.”


Q: What are you passionate about? 

A: I am passionate about my family, my husband, and my children. I am also really passionate about cooking. I am a food blogger, and I started a little over a year ago. Though I took a break for a long while, I discovered it never really left my mind. I love to cook and try new recipes, and I guess I’ve made it much harder for my husband to watch his weight. It’s so rewarding for me to see my friends and family enjoy my cooking. I discovered in my mid-twenties when I was at university, where I loved to cook and bake for my friends. I also realized most of my friends came to visit because they knew I would make their favorite delicious meals. This was what made me start paying attention to my passion for the culinary art of food and recipe creation. Presently, I am working on growing my recipe-sharing vlogs. I am planning to write my recipe book as well.

Q: What were your younger years like?

A:  I grew up in Africa, and I come from a really big family of 9 kids, with me being the 8th. While it was fun, I had so many voices in my head because I had so many older siblings that always told me what they felt was best for me, despite the fact that I knew what I wanted. I was never bullied, I was really loved, and being an adult now, I realized all the things they did were done in love. My early years were spent in my home country in Nigeria, but I spent my university years in Francophone Benin Republic, where I studied marketing and commercial communication.

Q: What is something valuable you’d like others to know?

A: I have come to learn and understand that good things take time. Nothing good comes easily. You have to be ready to put in the work even when you’re not getting the results you desire. You can’t wish it to happen; you have to make it happen. As you are making it happen, remember to be patient and know it’s only a matter of time; it would grow.

Q: What does feminism mean to you?
A:
Feminism for me is about being true to yourself as a woman. I embrace my uniqueness and the value I bring to my family, but I still believe in my dreams and going after my aspirations. I believe my role in the family only supports my competence in the market place, and this should not be a disadvantage.

MORE ABOUT AMA: I am originally from Nigeria. My family and I lived in Europe for some years, but now, we live in Canada. In terms of business and career, I’ve spent most of my years as a beautician and makeup artist. I ran a business that catered to high-end clientele by providing bespoke cosmetic products for specific skin types and mobile spa services. I later ran a makeup artist studio. I also worked as an employment advisor.

Thank you for reading!

Let’s connect! Here:

Here’s my Instagram handle link: https://www.instagram.com/amascookinghub/

YouTube: https://youtube.com/c/AmasKitchen